Easy Christianity

9. Prophecy and the Tribulation

Another characteristic of the "Easy Christianity" is its fascination with prophecy. Other important topics may not draw the crowds, but prophecy will pack the house! The fact is, the popular, prophetic scheme panders to the carnal itch of many so-called Christians. Some who believe this scheme are serious Christians, but the scheme itself is made to order for "Easy Christianity."

This is the case because this scheme teaches that Christians won't go through "The Tribulation." The Bible teaches that just before the end of this age a short period of heightened wickedness, violence, and persecution will occur before Christ returns to rescue his people. This period is often called "The Tribulation." From the earliest period of church history till the middle of the last century every Christian teacher taught that the church would go through "The Tribulation." This did not surprise the church since it had known all along that "through many tribulations we must enter the kingdom of God" (Acts 14:22).

Such a prospect, however, was totally unacceptable to the followers of "Easy Christianity." Thus, the teaching became popular that Christ would secretly come before "The Tribulation" to take the church out of the world. Thus "comforted", such "Christians" were freed to indulge their curiosity about prophecy secure in the knowledge that it would all happen after they were gone. Such curiosity was worse than useless, of course, since it could by definition have no personal application.

Amazingly, this teaching became popular despite the fact that the Bible never asserts it and, in fact, teaches the opposite in the clearest language (cf. 1 Thessalonians 4:13-5:11; 2 Thessalonians 1:5-10; 2:1-12; Matthew 24:29-51; Luke 17:22-37). Oh, the power of the heart to deceive itself! Do you have the kind of Christianity that can enter the kingdom through many tribulations? Only such Christianity will save you!


10. Prophecy and the Judgment
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Bill Newcomer, Webservant. Send comments to: mrbill@vor.org. Original WWW publication December A.D. 1995. Moved to vor.org, November, A.D. 1996.